Responsibilities and requirements

People with certain mobility needs use wheelchair accessible vehicles (WAVs) to go to work, school and social events. 

WAV drivers provide an important service to these passengers. 

To ensure everyone stays safe, drivers of WAVs must receive special training.  

 

What do I need to do to become an accredited WAV driver? 

You need to complete two tests – one theoretical and one practical. 

To complete these tests, you will need to show that you can provide safe WAV services. That includes:  

  • Hoists 
  • Wheelchair restraints 
  • Passenger restraints 
  • Daily pre-operational vehicle checks 

 

How can I book the test to become a WAV driver? 

Information on how to book the assessment can be found on the ST Vic website – www.safetransport.vic.gov.au 

 

What should I do to stay up to date? 

WAV drivers should complete refresher training every 12-18 months.  

You can also ask your Booking Service Provider (BSP) or vehicle owner for training if you have not driven for some time.  

Safety standards change and you must stay up to date with these changes. Your BSP or ST Vic can tell you about any changes.  

 

Do I need to keep records of my WAV training? 

Yes. You should keep a logbook of your training, or you can ask your BSP to give you proof of completion of WAV training.  

People with certain mobility needs use wheelchair accessible vehicles (WAVs) to go to work, school and social events.  

To ensure everyone stays safe, drivers of WAVs must receive special training.  

Booking Service Providers (BSPs) must train drivers and make sure they provide safe services.    

 

What training do I need to provide? 

You must ensure your drivers can provide safe WAV services. That includes:  

  • Hoists  
  • Wheelchair restraint  
  • Passenger restraint 
  • Daily pre- operational vehicle checks  

 Safety standards change. Make sure you regularly check your training and processes are up to date.  

BSPs should provide refresher training to WAV drivers every 12-18 months or if earlier when: 

  • There are vehicle or equipment changes 
  • A safety complaint has been made  
  • A notifiable incident has occurred 

 

How can I provide training? 

Training can be led by an instructor, web based or practical (on the job).  

You can provide the training directly or use a third party provider.  

 

What records do I need to keep? 

 As a registered BSP you have record-keeping and reporting responsibilities. This includes vehicle and equipment service maintenance records. 

 

You must keep a training register that includes:  

  • Driver’s full name  
  • Driver’s accreditation number  
  • Date of training  
  • Type of training (e.g. induction, refresher or targeted training)  
  • Details of the trainer  
  • Training location   

 

ST Vic can check your training register at any time.  

People with certain mobility needs use wheelchair accessible vehicles (WAVs) to go to work, school and social events.  

To ensure everyone stays safe, drivers of WAVs must receive special training.  

Vehicle owners must train their WAV drivers so that they can provide safe rides.   

 

What training do I need to provide?  

You must ensure your drivers can provide safe WAV services. That includes:  

  • Hoists  
  • Wheelchair restraint  
  • Passenger restraint 
  • Daily pre-operational vehicle checks  

Safety standards change. Make sure you regularly check your training and processes are up to date.  

Vehicle owners should provide refresher training to WAV drivers every 12-18 months or if earlier when: 

  • There are vehicle or equipment changes 
  • A safety complaint has been made  
  • A notifiable incident has occurred 

 

How can I provide training? 

Training can be led by an instructor, web based or practical (on the job).  

You can provide the training directly or use a third party provider.  

 

What records do I need to keep? 

As a registered vehicle owner you have record-keeping and reporting responsibilities. This includes vehicle and equipment service maintenance records. 

You must keep a training register that includes:  

  • Driver’s full name  
  • Driver’s accreditation number  
  • Date of training  
  • Type of training (e.g. induction, refresher or targeted training)  
  • Details of the trainer  
  • Training location   

 

ST Vic can check your training register at any time.  

People with certain mobility needs use wheelchair accessible vehicles (WAVs) to go to work, school and social events.  

To ensure everyone stays safe, drivers of WAVs must receive special training.  

Assessors must assess WAV drivers to ensure they are competent.   

 

What do I need to provide in my training sessions? 

You need to assess drivers according to the requirements in TLIC0026 – Provide wheelchair accessible services to passengers with disabilities.  

The assessment must: 

  • Occur in real time and last at least 60 minutes 
  • Include a range of relevant scenarios, exercises, case studies role plays and/or simulations 
  • Provide all necessary materials and equipment 
  • Record reasons for satisfactory or unsatisfactory result 
  • Consider the literacy levels and learning styles of different drivers and deliver materials accordingly 

 

Do I need to keep records? 

Yes, you must keep private records of your completed assessments and checklists.  

Safe Transport Victoria can ask to see copies of training assessment records at any time.  

You can refer to Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA) for help with how to keep records.  

 

What else do I need to do? 

You need to share assessment results with the driver you are assessing (pass or not yet competent) and the reason why they achieved this result.  

You need to review any feedback from drivers and trainers to continuously improve your processes.  

 

How can I become an assessor? 

You need to provide the following information to Safe Transport Victoria: 

  • Documented assessment strategy, including written content and structure of the assessment 
  • Practical assessment plans, tasks and assessor checklists 
  • Certified copy of your Certificate IV Training and Assessment from a recognised training provider 
  • Evidence of your relevant training and assessment experience 
  • Details of your own W-endorsement 

Assessor contracts must be renewed with ST Vic every 12 months. 

Wheelchair accessible vehicle (WAV) endorsement

Obtaining WAV endorsement

In Victoria, drivers must have a wheelchair accessible commercial passenger vehicle (WAV or W) endorsement on their driver accreditation to drive a WAV. This is an additional requirement for drivers regulated by Safe Transport Victoria.

To operate a WAV, drivers must pass an assessment that tests their knowledge and skills. This assessment includes both theoretical and practical components.

Only drivers who have successfully passed the assessment and received a W endorsement are allowed to provide commercial passenger WAV services to passengers who use wheelchairs or mobility scooters.

Drivers will be assessed on successfully demonstrating their skills and knowledge of:

  • ability to conduct pre-vehicle checks on a WAV vehicle
  • communicating effectively with a wide variety of passengers using a WAV service
  • assisting passengers into and out of a WAV suited to their disability needs
  • operating a WAV vehicle
  • planning scheduled activities
  • understanding ethical and responsible behaviours

Preparing for the assessment

It is important that drivers prepare for the training assessment. Drivers must successfully demonstrate they understand all the requirements of driving a WAV in Victoria.

The assessment has both theory and practical components and is broadly based on the Provide wheelchair accessible taxi services to passengers with disabilities TLIC2040A unit of competency from the Certificate II in Driving Operations.

Drivers should complete some training and study available resources prior to booking the assessment.

The criteria used during the practical component is like the Programmed Observation Licence Assessment (POLA) used by VicRoads. This standard was developed to achieve a consistent and objective evaluation of an applicant during assessment.

The practical assessment criteria are similar to those for providing wheelchair accessible taxi services to passengers with disabilities, as described in TLIC2040. For more information, visit https://training.gov.au/training/details/tlic2040.

How to book your assessment

To book an assessment, please contact ST Vic driver@safetransport.vic.gov.au or on 1800 638 802.

If sending an email to us, please write ‘W endorsement booking’ in the subject line and include in the body:

  • your name and contact details
  • the number of assessments required
  • Driver Accreditation numbers for each of the drivers to be assessed
  • contact details
  • preferred location.

We will contact you within two business days to discuss your requirements. Please note that three business days’ notice of rescheduling is required.

Before booking, applicants must have:

  • a current driver accreditation
  • identified the area in Victoria that would be most suitable for being assessed (for example, metropolitan Melbourne or a location in regional Victoria).

The cost of completing the assessment is $190 and payable directly to the assessor. This applies to all applicants.

If you are a booking service provider wanting to register your drivers who are ready for assessment for the W endorsement, please ensure to include:

  • Driver Accreditation numbers for each of the drivers to be assessed
  • your driver’s full names
  • information on the available WAV vehicles at your depot.

  1. Check the vehicle.
  2. Load a wheelchair in the vehicle with a passenger using a hoist.
  3. Load a second wheelchair in the vehicle without a passenger using a hoist.
  4. Undertake a directed drive of approximately 30 minutes.
  5. Unload the wheelchair without a passenger using a hoist.
  6. Unload the second wheelchair with a passenger using a hoist.
  7. Load a wheelchair using a ramp.
  8. Unload a wheelchair using a ramp.
  9. Scenario based disability assessor questions.

Transporting wheelchair passengers

Helping passengers in and out of the vehicle

Drivers must give reasonable help to a person to get them into and out of the vehicle. Always ask how you can assist your passenger with their journey. Be respectful and treat passengers with a disability as you would treat any other passenger, that is fairly and with dignity.

For example you can offer to push, but should not insist on pushing a passenger’s wheelchair onto a hoist or up a ramp. Electric and manual wheelchairs are generally suitable to be transported in a WAV with the person seated.

Who can be transported in a WAV

Passengers cannot be seated in a mobility scooter, a ‘Princess’ reclining chair, and other ‘high-care’ aids while riding in a WAV, as it is not safe.

However, they can be carried in a WAV if the driver can safely restrain the chair to stop it moving the passenger can move into a fixed seat in the vehicle and use the seat belt.

A passenger occupying a wheelchair must not be carried in a commercial passenger vehicle unless:

  • the wheelchair is securely restrained by applying restraints to the floor from two points on the front and two points on the rear of the wheelchair frame
  • the passenger is secured by a seat belt fitted to the taxi and which has been properly adjusted and fastened
  • the wheelchair is positioned with the occupant facing towards the front of the vehicle and with the wheelchair located between the appropriate restraint attachment tracks/points on the floor.

Passengers using scooters: 

A passenger who uses a mobility scooter must be seated in a conventional passenger seat for the duration of the journey and wear a seat belt

The scooter must be fitted with restraints to prevent movement of the scooter during the journey. If the scooter cannot be safely secured and restrained within the taxi, the scooter must not be carried.

Always remember to...

  • ask for permission prior to moving a passenger in a wheelchair
  • ask how you can assist them into and out of the vehicle
  • allow a passenger with an assistance animal to bring the animal into the passenger area of the vehicle
  • ensure the person is safe and ready before lifting them into position when using a rear hydraulic lifter
  • store any mobility aid safely and where it will not interfere with the movement of passengers into or out of the vehicle
  • offer to assist to load and unload any mobility aids
  • help passengers take any mobility aid, luggage or other items into and out of the vehicle.

How to process transactions for members of interstate subsidy programs

Passengers from other states can travel in Victoria by using a paper voucher provided by their home state.

Drivers are urged to accept these paper vouchers and help improve the travelling experience of interstate visitors with mobility needs. (Ask your BSP first to make sure they can process the vouchers).

If you process an interstate voucher, make sure all the trip and fare details are filled out.

Your booking service provider will invoice Safe Transport Victoria for reimbursement of the subsidised amount.

If an out-of-state person who gets a subsidy because of their disability needs help getting in and out of the car, you cannot charge them extra. Instead, you can use the meter while helping them.

Lifting fees for wheelchair and mobility scooters

Safe Transport Victoria pays a fee to the Booking Service Provider for drivers helping MPTP members in wheelchairs or scooters get into wheelchair accessible vehicles (WAVs). The fee recognises the additional time it takes a driver to safely load and unload a passenger in a wheelchair or on a scooter. We also pay a partial fee for loading wheelchairs into other types of vehicles.

Eligible WAV passengers will have ‘Wheelchair/Scooter’ embossed on their MPTP card.

The current lifting fees effective from 1 September, 2023 are:

Lifting fee (for WAVs in all Victoria) $30.00
Lifting fee (for conventional taxis in urban, regional and country) $12.20
PBBS booking fee $7.35

Because the lifting fee recognises the time it takes drivers to load and unload wheelchair and scooter users, the fare calculation device or meter must not be running while the MPTP passenger is being loaded or unloaded.

MPTP members that use a wheelchair or scooter are never required to pay the lifting fee personally.

Your booking service provider or the vehicle owner will pass your share of the payment on to you, subject to any applicable private employment or contractual arrangements.

If a passenger with a wheelchair or scooter is not an MPTP member, no lifting fee is charged, and the meter can be turned on while loading and unloading. This applies even when transporting WAV passengers from other states or from overseas.

A driver cannot directly charge or ask for the lifting fee from the passenger.

The lifting fee is indexed and so it is good practice to keep informed by regularly checking the ST Vic website for changes.

Vehicle requirements

WAVs must meet a range of important requirements to ensure the safety of passengers.

It’s the responsibility of the vehicle owner and the driver to ensure:

  • each vehicle is equipped with the necessary restraint systems to safely secure each wheelchair and its occupant
  • the vehicle has a functioning air conditioner/heater and
  • all the equipment is maintained in good working order.

These requirements are included in the Determination of Specifications for Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles PDF, 189.5 KB (CPVV WAV Specifications) published in the Victoria Government Gazette on 20 February 2020.

Requirement Specification

 

Allocated floor space

Each wheelchair position (allocated floor/ceiling space) must be allocated at least 1300mm (length) x 800mm (width) x 1500mm (height) as required by the DSAPT.
Door entry

The vehicle access door must have:

  • an unobstructed vertical height of at least 1500 mm (mirroring the DSAPT), and
  • an unobstructed width of at least 800 mm (this requirement is specific to the Victorian Specification).
Wheelchair/occupant restraint systems Each wheelchair position must be fitted with a:

  • wheelchair restraint system, and
  • an occupant restraint system (seat belts).

Seat belts

Seat belts must be:

  • the lap and sash emergency locking retractor type, or a
  • the lap and harness type assembly.

A lap only seat belt is not a compliant restraint system for people in wheelchairs.

Wheelchair restraint systems

  • Wheelchairs must be securely tied down at four (4) points
  • Wheelchair restraints must be free from fraying, tears and knots
  • All restraints must be installed to ensure a universal correct fitting and comply with the applicable Australian/New Zealand standards*.

Hoists

Hoists fitted to WAVs must:

  • be securely mounted to the vehicle
  • have a skid-resistant loading surface, and
  • have approach edges with an outer roll stop that is effective when the hoist is raised off the ground.

Ramps

Any ramp fitted to a WAV, when commencing service, must have a gradient (slope) no steeper than one in six (1 in 6) and a width of not less than 800mm.

Hoists and ramps should be serviced regularly by the manufacturer or its agent to ensure the equipment remains in good working order.

Hoists and ramps must comply with the applicable Australian/New Zealand Standards^.

Inspections Safe Transport Victoria continues to inspect WAVs to ensure they comply with the WAV Specifications. This includes making sure each WAV has the correct type and number of restraints to match the number of wheelchair positions.

Failure to comply with the WAV requirements may result in compliance action against the vehicle owner and/or driver.

Disability standards for accessible public transport WAVs are required to comply with the Commonwealth’s Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002. These contain standards for WAVs related to:

  • ramps
  • door entry
  • boarding
  • allocated space
  • grabrails
  • signs
  • alarms.

 

Vehicles proposed to be used as WAVs must be modified to accommodate wheelchairs and comply with the following rules and standards:

  • Australian Design Rules (ADRs)
  • Australian Standards
  • Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport (DSAPT) – Commonwealth.

Vehicle conversion companies known to us are listed alphabetically below.

Please note:

  • other companies may also be able to modify vehicles to meet the necessary wheelchair accommodation standards, even if they are not listed
  • if you want to know which make/model of vehicle a specific company can modify and what seat configuration options are available, you need to make inquiries yourself.

Wheelchair  accessible taxi vehicle conversion companies

Company Phone Web
Amind Pty Ltd (07) 3255 5066 www.amind.com.au
Automobility Pty Ltd (03) 9762 2277 www.automobility.com.au
AVA Tieman (03) 9305 2255 www.tieman.com.au
Byron Group (03) 8354 6400 www.byrongroup.com.au
Disability Transport Solutions QLD (07) 3170 3777 www.dtsq.com.au
Flash Cab Australia 1800 775 333
Freedom Motors Australia Pty Ltd 1800 672 437 www.freedommotorsaustralia.com.au
Jamieson Auto Fit Pty Ltd (03) 9364 8570 www.jamiesonautofit.com.au
K & M Kite (Aust) Pty Ltd (07) 5594 7708 www.kmkite.com.au
Norden Conversions (03) 9793 1066 www.norden.com.au
Safe In Motion 0490 514 009 www.safeinmotion.com.au
VMS Geelong (03) 5278 4705 www.vmsgroup.net.au
V-Gear – Ferntree Gully (03) 9758 7276

The Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle Subsidy Scheme

The Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle (WAV) Subsidy Scheme is part of an ongoing commitment to expand and maintain the accessibility of WAV services in urban, regional and country Victoria.

The scheme subsidises the purchase costs of a WAV to make it similar in cost to a conventional vehicle that provides unbooked (taxi) services.

WAVs that only operate in the Melbourne Metropolitan area, including trips starting or finishing in Metropolitan Melbourne, cannot be subsidised.

To qualify for the subsidy scheme, you must meet the following eligibility criteria:

  • you have owned and operated an urban, regional or country WAV (taxi) licence prior to 9 October 2017, and have continued to provide WAV services in these areas with a current CPV registration
  • you are replacing a WAV that is older than five years
  • you are able to accept and process Multi Purpose Taxi Program (MPTP) payments
  • you do not owe a previous unexpired subsidy to CPVV (if a previously subsidised vehicle has been sold or written off, and CPVV has instructed you to repay some of the subsidy payment).

Important: Subsidised WAVs are required to operate exclusively in the region nominated on the application.

You can learn more and apply for the subsidy by consulting the subsidy scheme guidelines, which contain:

  • information about the scheme
  • the schedule of subsidy payments
  • an application form.

See the guidelines here: Wheelchair Accessible Vehicle Subsidy Scheme Guidelines.

We’ll try to review your subsidy application and let you know within 14 days if it’s approved or not.

If we need more information, we’ll contact you. You should respond to our request for more information within 30 days, or your application may be rejected.

I’m replacing my non-WAV for a WAV; how long will the process take?

If you’re applying for the subsidy to buy a WAV to replace your current unbooked taxi, it’s best to apply early.

You should also think about how much time it will take to modify the new vehicle to carry wheelchairs, but this can be discussed with the vehicle supplier. To make sure you can start using the new WAV on time, we recommend applying at least six months  before you wish to start using the WAV.

The following certified or original documents must be submitted within six months from the date of your approval letter (satisfying the conditions for payment):

  • inspection report to confirm compliance with ‘Vehicle Standards Information 31, Licensed Passenger Vehicle Standards – Taxi’, which is available online at vicroads.vic.gov.au
  • engineering certification for WAV conversion (if applicable)
  • evidence of comprehensive insurance cover on the vehicle
  • proof of vehicle ownership
  • provision of new vehicle details form (note this form will be sent to you once the WAV Subsidy Agreement is signed)
  • the tax invoice for the purchase of the vehicle
  • a separate tax invoice for the conversion to a WAV (if not included in the vehicle purchase).

If the driver loads or unloads your wheelchair into a regular taxi or sedan, Safe Transport Victoria will pay a partial lifting fee of $10.90 to the service provider.

Important tips when loading or unloading a WAV passenger

The lifting equipment attached to the WAV must only be used by a W-endorsed driver.

Depending on the wheelchair user’s preference, wheelchairs may be manoeuvred – and their
brakes applied and released – by either the WAV driver or the wheelchair user. In the case of an
electric wheelchair, switching off the control box should be considered equivalent to applying brakes.

Never touch the joystick of a passenger’s wheelchair – this control can be sensitive and could cause sudden unexpected movement and never allow a passenger to stand on the hoist without being seated in a wheelchair or on a scooter.

It is the responsibility of the WAV driver to ensure that all of the following steps are followed regardless of whom is operating the wheelchair throughout the loading process.

  1. Ensure the vehicle is legally parked in a safe place with enough loading room.
  2. Ask permission to touch the wheelchair or get agreement from the wheelchair user as to whom will position the wheelchair and apply the brakes.
  3. The wheelchair is positioned safely out of the way of the hoist.
  4. Brakes are applied on the wheelchair.
  5. The rear door of the vehicle is open and the hoist is safely lowered.
  6. Brakes are released on the wheelchair.
  7. The wheelchair is positioned safely on the hoist platform with the wheelchair facing forward (towards the front of the vehicle).
  8. The brakes are applied on the wheelchair and another check is made to ensure the wheelchair cannot accidentally roll forward or backward.
  9. Ensure the passenger is safe and ready with their legs and feet out of danger, before using the hoist to raise the wheel chair to the level of the floor of the vehicle.
  10. Raise the hoist correctly with one hand on the wheelchair and the other on the controller.
  11. Ensure the hoist platform is level with the floor of the WAV before moving the wheelchair into the WAV.
  12. Brakes are released on the wheelchair.
  13. The wheelchair is moved into the correct position.
  14. Brakes are applied on the wheelchair.
  15. Lock the two front anchorage restraints into the floor tracks. Note that this may be done before the passenger is hoisted into the WAV.
  16. Connect the two front anchorage restraints to two secure points on the wheelchair.
  17. Lock the two rear anchorage restraints into the floor tracks.
  18. Connect the two rear anchorage restraints to two secure points on the wheelchair.
  19. Brakes are released on the wheelchair.
  20. Tighten the rear anchorage restraints using the ratchet mechanism on each restraint.
  21. Brakes are released on the wheelchair.
  22. Attach and fit the wheelchair occupant restraint fittings (seatbelt) correctly – not across the throat or the pelvis.
  23. Ask if the passenger needs any further assistance and if they are comfortable before starting the trip.

As for loading the passenger, the lifting equipment attached to the WAV must only be used by the driver. Check with the wheelchair user what their preference is regarding operating the wheelchair during the unloading process.

  1. Legally park the vehicle in a safe place and with enough room to unload.
  2. Open the rear door of the vehicle.
  3. Lower the hoist safely from being stowed upright to a position level with the vehicle floor.
  4. Release the passenger from the wheelchair occupant restraint fittings (seatbelt).
  5. Release the two rear anchorage restraints from the wheelchair.
  6. Release the two front anchorage restraints from the wheelchair.
  7.  Release the brakes on the wheelchair.
  8. Slowly position the wheelchair safely on the hoist platform.
  9. Apply the brakes on the wheelchair.
  10. Lower the hoist to ground level correctly with one hand on the wheelchair and the other on the controller.
  11. Release the brakes on the wheelchair.
  12. Move the wheelchair off the hoist or inform the passenger once it is safe to reverse out from the hoist.
  13. Position the wheelchair safely and apply the brakes.

It is the responsibility of the WAV driver to ensure that all of the following steps are followed regardless of who is operating the wheelchair throughout the loading process.

  1. Legally park the vehicle in a safe place with enough loading room.
  2. Ask permission to touch the wheelchair.
  3. Position the wheelchair safely out of the way of the ramp.
  4. Apply the brakes on the wheelchair.
  5. Open the rear wheelchair entry door.
  6. Unlock and position the ramp for safe loading.
  7. Release the brakes on the wheelchair.
  8. Position the wheelchair safely at the bottom of the ramp.
  9. Apply the brakes on the wheelchair
  10. Unlock the front restraints using the lock switch.
  11. Connect the two front restraints to two secure points on the wheelchair.
  12. Release the brakes on the wheelchair.
  13. Push the wheelchair smoothly into the vehicle with both hands on the wheelchair.
  14. Position the wheelchair correctly.
  15. Lock the two front restraints with the lock switch.
  16. Lock the two rear anchorage restraints into the floor tracks/points.
  17. Connect the two rear anchorage restraints to two secure points on the wheelchair.
  18. Release the brakes on the wheelchair.
  19. Tighten the two rear anchorage restraints using the ratchet mechanism on each restraint.
  20. Apply the brakes on the wheelchair.
  21. Attach and fit the wheelchair occupant restraint fittings (seatbelt) correctly – not across the throat or the pelvis.
  22. Ask if the passenger needs any further assistance and if they are comfortable.
  23. Position and lock the ramp in the vehicle.
  24. Close the rear wheelchair entry door.

The equipment attached to the WAV must only be used by the driver. The same points regarding operation of the wheelchair in the loading process detailed in the loading section of this page also apply for unloading.

Passengers are not allowed to remain seated on mobility scooters during their journey in a WAV.
A passenger who uses a mobility scooter must be seated in a conventional passenger seat for the duration of the journey and wear the seatbelt provided for that position.

The scooter must be fitted with all restraints to prevent movement of the scooter during the journey. A scooter must only be loaded if it can be safely loaded, carried and adequately secured using approved restraints.

Under no circumstances is it safe to transport passengers while they remain seated in high-care mobility aids as doing so puts their safety, and the safety of other occupants of the vehicle, at risk.

Mobility aids like the ‘Princess’, ‘Duchess’ and ‘Tub’ chairs/beds lack the structural integrity to withstand a minor impact and, in the event of an accident, their tilt-lock mechanism or the frame could fail, exposing the occupant to serious injury. As these aids carry the occupant in a reclined position, the occupant cannot be properly restrained. There is a danger they could slip under the restraint, endangering themselves and others.

High-care mobility aids do not meet Australian design and construction standards—and manufacturers advise that they are not designed to be carried in vehicles while the passenger is in them.

Any driver who allows a passenger to travel in one of these mobility aids in their vehicle is not only risking their own physical safety, but also their driver accreditation. Drivers are also opening themselves up to potential legal liability if the passenger is injured.

Below are examples of mobility aids that may be carried but the passenger must transfer to a fixed seat in the WAV

Below are examples of mobility aids where a passenger can remain seated during travel.

Motorised wheelchair

Motorised wheelchair

Manual wheelchair

 

Vehicle and equipment checks before you drive a WAV

The Commercial Passenger Vehicle Industry Act 2017 establishes a range of safety duties for all industry participants.
Drivers also have a responsibility to ensure that they are providing a safe service and should not be driving a vehicle that has faults or defects.

If the check of the WAV finds any faults or defects, they must be reported to the vehicle owner or booking service provider. If the driver owns the vehicle, they must take responsibility for fixing the issue.

At the start of every shift the following preoperational vehicle and equipment checks should be carried out on the WAV in addition to those that would be carried out on a conventional vehicle.

Inside the vehicle, check that:

• the ramp or hydraulic lift (hoist) is operating properly
• the ramp or hoist control boxes or switches are operating properly
• all occupant restraints can be accounted for and are fully functional (it is a good idea to have a spare set of restraints)
• an adequate number of functioning wheelchair tie-downs are stored in the vehicle and are in good working order
• floor tracking is undamaged.